• 7 Kasım 2019
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What can drinking hookah do to your blood vessels?

New research suggests that drinking hookah may impair the endothelial function of blood vessels, a key indicator of cardiovascular health.

Drinking hookah can damage your blood vessels, showing a new study.
More and more people quit smoking and are sensitive to doing so.

Smoking is preventable cause of deaths in the United States “According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cigarettes cause over 480,000 deaths.

However, more and more people are declining, like regular smoking, turning to alternatives that many perceive to be safer. smoking electronic cigarettes or hookah.

However, is it really safe to smoke hookah? Several recent studies show that the answer is “no”. For example, a course study found that today’s Medical News handled in 2016, a single hookah session gave 10 times the amount of carbon monoxide present in a regular cigarette.

A more recent study has found that smoking a hookah, also known as hookah, can harden the arteries to a degree that normal cigarettes can achieve.

So is the expansion of the aorta, another effect for arterial stiffness, with a predictor stroke and citrus drinking.

Now, the scientific researches of the American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 – presented in new research adds to evidence suggesting that drinking IL – hookah in Chicago can really harm cardiovascular health.

He is an assistant professor at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Nursing. Mary Rezk-Hanna is the lead author of the study.

To examine the effects of drinking hookah

Rezk-Hanna and her colleagues examined 30 young, healthy adults before and after attending a hookah smoking session. The participants were on average 26 years old.

The team examined the nicotine blood levels before and after the participants’ smoking session and measured exhaled carbon monoxide levels and a marker of a named artery function. flow-mediated dilation of blood vessels

How does 30 minutes of hookah affect your heart? Our findings challenge the idea that fruit-flavored hookah tobacco smoking is a healthier tobacco alternative.

The second measure explains the dilation or dilation of blood vessels when blood flow increases. Flow-mediated dilation is a measure of the endothelial function of the arteries, and many consider endothelial dysfunction as “the first stage of the atherosclerotic process”.

In this study, researchers compared the results of these measures to the effects of a normal cigarette in people of normal smoking age.

In addition, Rezk-Hanna and her team took the same measurements before and after she was asked to use an electronic device to fill a carbon monoxide gas mixture that mimics the effects of hookah smokers normally obtained from a coal heated hookah smoker.

Researchers found that exhaled carbon monoxide levels were nine to 10 times higher in coal-heated hookah cigarettes than in electronically heated hookah or regular cigarettes. Nicotine levels were equally high in all smoking sessions.

At the same time, the study discovered that flow-mediated dilatation was higher after smoking coal-heated hookah, electronically heated hookah or traditional smoking reduced flow-mediated dilatation. A lower flow-mediated dilation indicates endothelial dysfunction.

Researchers explain that the main difference between coal-heated and electric-heated hookah is that coal briquettes produce high levels of carbon monoxide.

This chemical, as the authors guessed, broadens the blood vessels, where coal-heated hookah drinking can mask the harmful effects it has on endothelial function.

Therefore, drinking hookah can harm blood vessel function in the same way as smoking.

“Hookah is the only tobacco product that uses charcoal briquettes to heat its flavored tobacco inside the hookah. Therefore, in addition to tobacco and nicotine-induced toxic substances, hookah smoke exposes users to coal combustion products, including large amounts of carbon monoxide.

Mary Rezk-Hanna, Ph.D.





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